Meetings & Announcements

Meeting Report: Strategies for Personal Monitoring

Meeting Topic: Strategies for Personal Monitoring

Moderator Name: Jay Dill

Speaker Name: Gino Sigismondi

Meeting Location: Online

The Central Indiana Section hosted Shure’s Gino Sigismondi for a presentation on personal or “in-ear” monitoring (IEM) systems.  The presentation began with an overview of IEM systems and a history of the technology.  As early as 1982 Marty Garcia built custom-fit earphones for stage use, and the first wireless IEM system was employed in the late 1980s using a simple FM transmitter.  By the late 90s, custom-built hardware gave way to commercial wireless IEM systems and “universal fit” earphones, greatly increasing IEM adoption.  The 2010s saw further advancement in diversity RF receivers, increased affordably, and personal mixing options.

Early in Gino’s overview of IEM system architecture, the topic of earphones was breached.  Despite seemingly endless earphone options, isolation was presented as the most significant consideration, as it provides the ability to hear a mix while maintaining a reasonable listening levels.  This point was reinforced later in the presentation when discussing the dangers of IEM listening at extreme levels, including issues with users removing one earphone.  Instead, Gino recommended the use of ambient mics or ambient headphone systems to provide audience feedback to IEM wearers.

From this broad system overview, Gino presented options for IEM system configuration, including receivers sharing a mix via a single transmitter, dual monophonic mixes from a single transmitter, and traditional stereo mixes. While stereo mixes provide a more realistic listener experience, both stereo and mono setups require tradeoffs.  Gino then presented a third option where each user receives two separate mono signals which can be balanced at the receiver, giving the user some local control of the mix.  The topic of distributed mixing was also introduced, along with potential pros and cons of such a system.  Case studies of scenarios for use of each of these options were presented, as well as example systems.

The presentation then shifted to the topic of RF management for IEMs.  Gino advocated for the use of inclusion groups, where wireless devices are segregated by type, with each using a different segment of available frequencies.  Similarly, wireless mic and IEMs units, and their antennas, should be physically isolated to reduce RF interference.  Proper antenna selection can also increase system effectiveness, with directional antennas being a significant way to reduce multipath dropouts.  Likewise, antenna combiners can help to reduce intermodulation issues within larger systems.

The presentation concluded with an audience Q&A.

Written by: Brett Leonard

Meeting Report: Exploring a Virtual Intercom System

Video from our last event is now posted on our YouTube page.

Meeting Topic: Exploring a Virtual Intercom System

Moderator Name: Jay Dill

Speaker Name: Hal Buttermore, Telos Alliance

Meeting Location: virtual (Zoom webinar)

Summary

The Central Indiana Section was joined by the Indianapolis section of the Society of Broadcast Engineers for a discussion of network-based intercom systems with Telos Alliance’s Hal Buttermore. The program began with a discussion about the paradigm shift involved in moving away from an intercom system based on dedicated hardware with a solution based on off-the-shelf computer and network hardware. Such a system feels similar to traditional intercom systems, with a variety of belt pack, desktop, and racked communication stations with typical party-line and talk-group configurations while taking advantage of current network technology, including AES67 integration. This creates a system that is lower in cost, easily scalable, and with greater end-user configurability.

An additional benefit of this system architecture is the ability to use existing VoIP technology for relatively simple interconnection between remote facilities. Telos employs the open standard OPUS codec for network communication between facilities. This wide area network can link remote production crews, separate affiliate studios, or even remote personnel to a central facility utilizing the same group and party lines. Included in this functionality is a “lite” mode for use with even typical residential wireless Internet and cellular modems. This capability was particularly useful through the pandemic, allowing production personnel working from home to share a reliable, dedicated intercom system.

Hal also highlighted the user configurability of such a system. In Telos’s Infinity intercom system, a simple drag-and-drop interface allows users to create party lines, talk groups, and direct connections within the system. A simple user interface allows receivers to be dropped into groups or party lines, or to create interruptible foldback (IFB) channels with near instant routing and availability. Finally, these routed groups, etc. can be dragged onto talk buttons for configuring belt packs, panels, or consoles as each user requires.

Finally, information was presented about Telos’s VIP system, which fully removes the requirement for hardware, replacing it with a single, dedicated intercom server. This Internet-connected server can then accommodate up to 16 virtual control panel/belt pack systems run through typical browsers, allowing operating system-agnostic usability with a simple link and password access system for users. This, combined with optional cloud-hosted servers and licensing based on virtual intercom quantity, allows the system to become scalable as needed while maintaining lower overall cost.

The program concluded with Q&A, moderated by section chair Jay Dill. The complete webinar is available for viewing on the CIS YouTube page: https://youtu.be/TwT2dTBLDh8

Written By: Brett Leonard

Exploring a Virtual Intercom System – Free Webinar

Intercom systems are a critical component for production operations. Learn about the flexibility in Telos’ Virtual Intercom Platform.

When:  Wednesday, February 23, 2022

Time:  7:00 EST (UTC-5)

Where:  Online Virtual Presentation

Presenter:  Hal Buttermore, Telos Alliance

Free Registration Required:   
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/259170043577

Central Indiana AES Announces New Leadership for 2022

The Central Indiana Section of the Audio Engineering Society is pleased to announce the following Executive Board and Committee for 2022 following a very successful election.

Executive Board:
Chair – Jay Dill
Vice Chair – Nate Sparks
Secretary – Brett Leonard
Treasurer – Phil Hodson

Committee Members:
Matthew Cast
Sean Rollins
Jeff Gardner
Tim Hsu
Luke Molloy
AJ Fager
Barrie Zimmerman

Congratulations to all, and thank you to those who served on the Executive Committee for the past two years. The Section looks forward to serving its members and the audio community in the years to come.

Remember, to stay up to date on section activities, be sure to follow us on Facebook or Twitter, and feel free to contact any member of the executive board to let us know your thoughts about the section.

Upcoming Elections

Members of the Central Indiana Section of the Audio Engineering Society-

After some delay due to the present health crisis, we are once again preparing to hold our biennial section election!  This election will include the positions of section chair, vice-chair, secretary, and treasurer, as well as committee members.  Candidates for these positions must be AES member in good standing who list Central Indiana as their primary section.  To nominate yourself or another member of the Central Indiana Section, please email the name, member number, email address, and short bio & headshot (if available) to the current section secretary, Brett Leonard by Thursday, January 20th, 2022.  In addition to section officer elections, the upcoming ballot will also include a proposed change of the Central Indiana Section’s name to the Indiana Section, intended to reflect that our Section activities are open to all throughout the state by removing the reference to the central Indiana geographic area, which often has been misinterpreted as being restrictive.  The full text of the relevant changes to the bylaws will be included in the ballot.

Voting will open on Monday, January 24th, 2022 via a secure, anonymous online ballot using your AES member number, and voting will remain open for two weeks.  Following voting, election results will be announced at the next section meeting, held virtually on Tuesday, February 8th, 2022 at 7 PM.

We are looking forward to a great year, a variety of new events/meetings, and a happy New Year!

Meeting Report: Historical Development of the Unidyne

Meeting Topic: Historical Development of the Unidyne I, II, III

Moderator Name: Jay Dill & Nate Sparks

Speaker Name: Gino Sigismondi & Michael Pettersen, Shure Inc.

Meeting Location: virtual (YouTube: https://youtu.be/bvg6FYMRuAs)

Date: January 21, 2021

Summary

Shure’s Michael Pettersen and Gino Sigismondi joined the Central Indiana Section to dive into the storied history of the Unidyne dynamic microphone motor/capsule and the subsequent evolution that have shaped our industry.
Michael began the program by taking us back to the original electrical equivalent diagrams written in Benjamin Bauer’s notebook in 1937, describing what would become the “Uniphase Network” to create a single-capsule, directional dynamic microphone. The design was complimented by the work of designer Wesley Sharer, along with a little inspiration from the grill of the ’37 Oldsmobile Coupe Six, and was released as the Unidyne Model 55 in 1939.
The Unidyne II was first released within the Model 55S in 1951. The Unidyne II features the same performance with a size some 30% smaller than the original Unidyne capsule, thus the “S” nomenclature for small. The new design was oriented towards the television medium, which considered the original Model 55 to be somewhat obtrusive.
The Unidyne III Model 545 was released in 1959, touted as the “smallest cardioid dynamic microphone” ever. The Model 545 was end-addressed, and therefore had a more consistent polar pattern than similar and competing models of the era. This led to popularity with the burgeoning sound reinforcement industry, as the pattern’s consistency allowed for more gain before feedback. The Beatles were marquis users of the Model 545 with the A25B swivel mount.
As the Model 545 gained popularity on stage, Bob Carr worked on a line of Unidyne III-based microphones to appeal specifically to studios. This line, dubbed “Studio Microphones” (SM) consisted of microphones using the same capsules as existing mics, but with less reflective finishes, no switches, and included XLR connectors. The venerable Unydine III SM56 was released in 1964, with the SM58 released just two short years later. While not instant sales successes, the use of the SM56 at the Monterey Pop Festival by McCune Sound in 1967 yet again raised their profile in the live sound arena. The push as a live sound microphone line occurred more in the 1970s with their introduction to the performers and sound companies in Las Vegas, with artist such as Frank Sinatra becoming devoted users. Also of note was the introduction of the now-famed SM7 in 1972.
Following the history of the Unidyne series, Gino and Michael took audience questions, as well as providing a little “audio mythbusters” surrounding the Unidyne family.

Written By: Brett Leonard

Historical Developments of the Shure “Unidyne”

What: Live Webinar – Historical Developments of the Shure “Unidyne”

When: January 21, 2021, 7:00 P.M. (EST)

Where: Live Webinar

Registration: https://bit.ly/37Hxb4d

The Central Indiana Section of the Audio Engineering Society presents “Historical Development of the Unidyne I, II, III”

Have you ever wondered how the Shure “Unidyne” became one of the most recognized and familiar items in the audio and broadcasting business?

Joins us as Michael Pettersen and Gino Sigismondi share historical information and photos from the Shure archives to give us an interesting and accurate history of the development and marketing of this classic microphone.

Thursday, January 21, 2021 Time: 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm (EST)

Register now to receive link to the live webinar

Virtual Social Hour to Celebrate the New Year

What: Virtual Social Hour via Zoom

When: January 5, 2021, 7:00 P.M. (EST)

Where: Virtual Meeting on Zoom

Registration: http://bit.ly/3pGeN30

Central Indiana AES Section joins in toasting the New Year! 
 

To help get the year 2021 started in a positive way, we have opted for a virtual “Social Hour.”  This will be an opportunity to re-connect with your professional friends in the audio and related fields…

– catch up on what you’ve been doing

– chat about what’s ahead

– share any concerns or positive events during the pandemic

– chat about industry happenings, changes, trends

– find out which company bought out the other
 

We hope this will be a way to help engage members and professionals in looking forward to a solid recovery in the New Year.  If there are enough participants, we will set up breakout rooms to provide a better opportunity to share among a smaller group. 

Looking forward to seeing and hearing from you on January 5th!  Don’t forget to bring your favorite drink so we can to toast to everyone’s health and well-being in the New Year.

This event is free and will be hosted virtually on Zoom. Register below at our Eventbrite page to receive connection info.